July 20, 1976 - Hank Aaron hit his 755th and final home run

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Hank Aaron hit the home run off of Dick Drago of the California Angels in front of his home crowd at Milwaukee County Stadium. His first career home run occurred over 22 years earlier, on April 23, 1954.

Aaron’s home run record lasted for over 31 years, until Barry Bonds broke it in August of 2007. After breaking the record, Bonds would go on to hit only six more home runs in his career, setting the new record at 762.

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July 18, 1927 - Ty Cobb became the first player in MLB history to collect 4,000 hits

Cobb retired after the 1928 season with 4,191 hits, a record that will stand until Pete Rose breaks it in 1985.

Having played his first 22 seasons with the Detroit Tigers, it is only appropriate that Cobb, now playing his first year with the Philadelphia Athletics, gets his 4,000th hit at Detroit’s Navin Field. Cobb reached the 4,000 hit milestone with a double off former teammate Sam Gibson in the first inning of a 5-3 loss to the Tigers.

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July 14, 1968 - Hank Aaron hit his 500th career home run

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With 499 career home runs under his belt, Atlanta Braves slugger Hank Aaron hit a three-run shot in the third inning off Giants’ pitcher Mike McCormick. Aaron was mobbed at home plate by his teammates and presented with an award by Braves President Bill Bartholomay honoring him as the seventh man in baseball history to hit 500 home runs.

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(via athleticpoetics)

June 23, 2003 - Barry Bonds steals 500th base; he’s the only player to hit 500 HR and steal 500 bases

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Bonds finished his career with 762 HRs and 514 steals.

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June 18, 1975 - Fred Lynn had one of the greatest single player games in MLB; he hit 3 home runs, 10 RBI, and had 16 total bases

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The Boston Red Sox were in Detroit facing the Tigers. It was the third game of a three-game series with Boston already taking the first two games. For whatever reason, Lynn had trouble sleeping on the morning of the 18th. Maybe he had an intuition of things to come, as he was about to embark on a legendary day. In the first inning, Lynn smashed an upper deck home run in right to give the Sox a 3-0 lead. In the next inning, Lynn destroyed a pitch that hit the roof of the upper deck in left center. In the third inning, he hit a triple (just missing another home run by three feet) with two more runs scoring to give the Sox an 11-1 lead. Finally, in the ninth inning, he crushed another upper deck home run in right again to score three runs. By the end of the game, which was won by the Sox, 15-1, Lynn had raised his batting average by 15 points.

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June 8, 2005 - Alex Rodriguez became the youngest player to reach 400 career home runs

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At 29 years, 316 days old, Alex Rodriguez became the youngest player to reach 400 career home runs.

That year Rodriguez won his second AL MVP Award in three seasons. He became the fifth player to win an MVP award with two different teams, joining Mickey Cochrane, Jimmie Foxx, Frank Robinson and Barry Bonds.

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May 23, 1948 - Joe DiMaggio hit three consecutive home runs in a single game

The New York Yankees' slugger Joe DiMaggio hit the first two of his consecutive three home runs off future Hall of Famer Bob Feller. The trio of round-trippers helped the Bronx Bombers defeat the Indians, 6-5.

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(via athleticpoetics)

May 18, 1956 - Mickey Mantle hit home runs from both sides of the plate for the third time in his career

"It’s unbelievable how much you don’t know about the game (specifically about his switch-hit home run record) you’ve been playing all your life." - Hall of Fame Outfielder Mickey Mantle (Ten Time “Member” of the Home Run From Both Sides of the Plate in a Game “Club”)

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May 9, 1984 - Chicago and Milwaukee end a 25-inning game that lasted 8 hrs, 6 min

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The longest American League game, and tied for the longest major league game by innings which ended with one team winning, was a 7-6 victory by the Chicago White Sox over the Milwaukee Brewers in 25 innings, at Comiskey Park in Chicago in 1984. The game began at 7:30 p.m. on the evening of May 8, and after scoring early runs both teams scored twice in the 8th inning; but the game was suspended after 17 innings with the score tied 3-3 due to a league rule prohibiting an inning from beginning after 12:59 a.m.

The game was continued the following evening, May 9, and both teams scored three times in the 21st inning to make the score 6-6; finally, in the bottom of the 25th, the White Sox’ Harold Baines hit a home run to end the contest. Tom Seaver was the winning pitcher in relief. (a regularly scheduled game followed, meaning both nights saw 17 innings played; Seaver also started, and won, the second game). The official time of the entire 25-inning game was 8 hours 6 minutes, also a major league record.

Apr. 30, 1961 - Willie Mays hit four home runs against the Milwaukee Braves

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Alvin Dark was hired to manage the San Francisco Giants before the start of the 1961 season and named Willie Mays team captain. The improving Giants finished 1961 in third place and won 85 games, more than any of the previous six campaigns. Mays had one of his best games on April 30, 1961, hitting four home runs against the Milwaukee Braves in County Stadium. Mays went four for five at the plate and was on deck for a chance to hit a record fifth home run when the Giants’ half of the ninth inning ended. Mays is the only Major Leaguer to have both three triples in a game and four home runs in a game.

Apr. 26, 1931 - Lou Gehrig hit a home run but is called out for passing a runner

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This mistake cost Lou Gehrig the AL home run crown as he and Babe Ruth tied with 46 HR for the season.

Gehrig lost a home run from his career total when the ball bounced back onto the field, was fielded by Sam Rice of the Senators, and thrown back towards the infielders. Lyn Lary, who was on first base, thought the ball was caught so after rounding third he headed into the dugout. Gehrig touched home (passing the runner), was called out, and credited by the official scorer with a triple costing him a home run and eventually the exclusive home run title for the 1931 season.

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Apr. 23, 1954 - Hank Aaron hit the first of his 755 major league home runs

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In 1953 the Milwaukee Braves signed Hank Aaron to a major league contract and gave the slugger a Braves uniform with the number five. On April 13, Aaron made his major league debut and was hitless in five at-bats. On April 15, Aaron collected his first major league hit (a double) and inevitably hit his first major league home run on April 23. Over the next 122 games, Aaron batted .280 with thirteen homers before he suffered a fractured ankle on September 5. He then changed his number to 44, which would turn out to look like a “lucky number” for the slugger. Aaron would hit 44 home runs in four different seasons, and he hit his record-breaking 715th career home run off Dodgers pitcher Al Downing, who coincidentally also wore number 44.

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Apr. 8, 1974 - Hank Aaron hit his 715th home run to break Babe Ruth’s home run record

As the 1974 season began, Hank Aaron's pursuit of the record caused a small controversy. The Atlanta Braves opened the season on the road in Cincinnati with a three-game series against the Cincinnati Reds. Braves management wanted him to break the record in Atlanta, and were therefore going to have Aaron sit out the first three games of the season. But Baseball commissioner Bowie Kuhn ruled that he had to play two games in the first series. He played two out of three, tying Babe Ruth’s record in his very first at bat — on his first swing of the season — off Reds pitcher Jack Billingham, but did not hit another home run in the series.

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Apr. 7, 1993 - 21 years ago, The Sandlot was released in theaters

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FOOOORRREEEEVVVEEEEEEERRRRR!

The Sandlot grossed $4 million in its opening weekend and a further $32 million through ticket sales. Figures for worldwide, VHS and DVD sales are estimated to be at $76 million. Since its release on both VHS and DVD, the film has become a cult favorite.

Do these names ring a bell? Scott “Scotty” Smalls, Benjamin Franklin “Benny the Jet” Rodriguez, Hamilton “Ham” Porter, Michael “Squints” Palledorous, Alan “Yeah-Yeah” McClennan, Kenny DeNunez, Timmy Timmons, Tommy “Repeat” Timmons.

"It isn’t hard to be good from time to time in sports. What’s tough is being good every day." - Willie Mays

All day. Every day.

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