Sept. 28, 1941 - Ted Williams finished the season with a .406 batting average

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Ted Williams batting average stood at .39955 with a season-finale doubleheader to be played the next day at Shibe Park, home of Connie Mack’s Athletics. Since batting averages are rounded to the next decimal, Williams could have sat out the final two games and still officially crested baseball’s imposing .400 barrier.

At the time, Williams said, “If I’m going to be a .400 hitter, I want more than my toenails on the line.”

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"A muscle is like a car. If you want it to run better in the morning, you have to warm it up." - Florence Griffith Joyner

Stretch it out.

Sept. 26, 1988 - Ben Johnson tested positive for steroids and stripped of his 100-meter gold medal

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On September 24, 1988, Johnson won the 100m final at the Summer Olympics in Seoul, lowering his own world record to 9.79 seconds. Johnson would later remark that he would have been even faster had he not raised his hand in the air just before he finished the race. However, Johnson’s urine samples were found to contain stanozolol, and he was disqualified two days later. He later admitted having used steroids when he ran his 1987 world record, which caused the IAAF to rescind that record as well. Johnson and coach Charlie Francis complained that they used doping in order to remain on an equal footing with the other top athletes on drugs they had to compete against.

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"The medals don’t mean anything and the glory doesn’t last. It’s all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing." - Jackie Joyner-Kersee

"Because I’m Happy." Pharrell Williams

Sept. 24, 1988 - Jackie Joyner-Kersee set a world record of 7,291 points in the heptathlon at the Olympics in Seoul

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At the 1988 Games in Seoul, Jackie Joyner-Kersee set the still-standing heptathlon world record of 7,291 points. The silver and bronze medalists were Sabine John and Anke Vater-Behmer, both of whom were representing East Germany. Five days later, Joyner-Kersee won her second gold medal, leaping to an Olympic record of 7.40 m (24 ft 3 1⁄4 in) in the long jump.

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Sept. 23, 1988 - Jose Conseco, at age 24, became the first player in MLB history to join the 40-40 club

The Major League benchmark for a truly great offensive season lasted nearly a century and was the attainment of 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases. In April of 1988, Jose Conseco guaranteed he would hit at least 40 home runs and steal at least 40 bases in the upcoming season. On September 23, 1988, an all-time plateau was reached as Conseco set the new benchmark for power & speed at 40 home runs (finished the season with 42) and 40 stolen bases during the same season.

In recognition of his record the street in front of his former high school was named after him but was later rescinded in 2008 after he admitted to previously using drugs throughout his career. That same year, he helped the Oakland Athletics to the World Series but they lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers in five games. Canseco was unanimously named the American League’s Most Valuable Player in 1988, with a .307 batting average, 120 runs scored, 124 RBI, 42 home runs, and 40 stolen bases.

Sept. 21, 1986 - Jets beat Dolphins, 51-45, with Ken O’Brien and Dan Marino setting an NFL record of 884 passing yards

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The two quarterbacks put on a legendary offensive performance as they set NFL single game records of 884 net passing yards and ten touchdown passes, records that still stand to this day. Dan Marino completed 30 of 50 passes for 448 yards and six touchdown passes. Ken O’Brien threw for 479 yards and four touchdown passes all to wide receiver Wesley Walker, including one with no time left on the clock to force overtime. A game that saw record setting performances from two quarterbacks fittingly ended with a long pass. The New York Jets completed the comeback with a 51-45 victory in overtime. To this day, it is the highest scoring game between the teams (96 total points).

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Sept. 20, 2009 - Brett Favre set an NFL record with his 271st straight start

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Since first being named the starter of the Green Bay Packers before playing the Pittsburgh Steelers on September 27, 1992, Brett Favre had never missed a game spanning over 18 1⁄2 consecutive seasons. He holds the record for the most consecutive starts by any player in the NFL with 297 (321 including playoffs), and is one of only seven quarterbacks to have started over 100 consecutive games in NFL history. He failed to finish a game due to injury on only eight occasions since taking control of the Packers as quarterback.

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Sept. 18, 1996 - Roger Clemens struck out 20 batters, tying his own record set 10 years earlier

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Roger Clemens started the game out strong striking out fifteen Detroit Tigers in the first six innings, Clemens played on the aggressiveness of the Detroit batters, throwing seemingly hittable fastballs by their bats and fooling them with hard sliders in the dirt. Going into the ninth inning, Clemens was unaware that he had already racked up19 strikeouts and was just one away from tying his own record. The first Detroit batter, Alan Trammell, hit an easy pop fly for the first out. The second, Ruben Sierra, singled before Tony Clark, who had already struck out three times, hit another fly ball for the second out. Travis Fryman then struck out swinging to become Clemens’ 20th victim. With the 4-0 win, Clemens also tied his team’s record for most shutouts by a pitcher (38) and most wins (192), both of which were set by legendary Sox pitcher Cy Young in 1911.

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Sept. 16, 1973 - O. J. Simpson became the first player in NFL to rush for 250 yards in one game

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This was the greatest rushing performance on opening weekend history. Dating back to 1933, no back has ever turned in a better kickoff-weekend effort than Hall of Famer O.J. Simpson. The Buffalo Bills former bruiser burned the New England Patriots for 250 yards and two touchdowns on 29 carries in a brilliant Week 1 showing. Simpson scored on an 80-yard run in the first quarter and a 22-yard run in the third quarter.

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(via athleticpoetics)

Sept. 15, 1978 - Ali defeated Spinks to become first boxer to win the heavyweight title three times

Leon Spinks made history on February 15, 1978, by beating Muhammad Ali on a 15-round decision in Las Vegas. Spinks won the world heavyweight title in his professional eighth fight, the shortest time in its history. Having sparred less than two dozen rounds in preparation for the fight, and coming in seriously out of shape by the opening bell, the aging Ali had expected an easy and lost the title by unanimous decision. It was one of the few occasions when Ali left the ring with a bruised and puffy face. Spinks’ victory over Ali was the peak of his career. He was the only man to take a title from Muhammad Ali in the ring. Ali’s other losses were non-title contests or bouts where Ali was the challenger.

A rematch followed shortly thereafter in New Orleans, which broke attendance records. Ali won a unanimous decision in an uninspiring fight, making him the first heavyweight champion to win the belt three times. Following his victory, Ali retired from boxing, only to make a brief comeback two years later. Ali, who once claimed he could “float like a butterfly, sting like a bee,” left the sport permanently in 1981.

Sept, 14, 2003 - Jamal Lewis set the then NFL record for yards gained in a single-game with 295

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Jamal Lewis broke the previous record of 278 single-game rushing yards held by Corey Dillon and finished the game with two touchdowns as the Baltimore Ravens beat the Cleveland Browns 33-13. Lewis would go on to log 2,066 yards for the season, second most at the time. Lewis was rewarded by being named NFL Offensive Player of the Year by the Associated Press.

Lewis’s single-game rushing record was later broken by Adrian Peterson of the Minnesota Vikings on November 4, 2007, when he ran for 296 yards against the San Diego Chargers.

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"I’m just like everybody else. I have two arms, two legs and four thousand hits." - Pete Rose

No big difference.

Sept. 11, 1985 - Pete Rose hits a single to become MLB all-time hit leader with 4,192

With his 4,192nd career hit Cincinnati Reds player-manager Pete Rose broke Ty Cobb’s major league record for career hits. Rose was a folk hero in Cincinnati, a homegrown talent known as “Charlie Hustle” for his relentless work ethic.

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Sept. 9, 1965 - Sandy Koufax becomes first pitcher in baseball to pitch four no-hitters

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Sandy Koufax of the Los Angeles Dodgers, by retiring 27 consecutive batters without allowing any to reach base, became the sixth pitcher of the modern era, eighth overall, to throw a perfect game. The game was Koufax’s fourth no-hitter, breaking Bob Feller’s Major League record of three (and later broken by Nolan Ryan, in 1981). Koufax struck out 14 opposing batters, the most ever recorded in a perfect game, and matched only by San Francisco Giants pitcher, Matt Cain, on June 13, 2012.

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