July 24, 1983 - The infamous Pine Tar incident with George Brett

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George Brett of the Kansas City Royals was ejected from a game against the New York Yankees for charging the home plate umpire after he ruled that Brett’s go-ahead, ninth inning home run off Rich Gossage would not count because there was too much pine tar on his bat. It is a legendary moment in baseball history and one of the most famous player-umpire arguments in the history of MLB.

July 24, 1983 - The infamous Pine Tar incident with George Brett

It is a legendary moment in baseball history. Upon hearing that his game-winning home run would be wiped away, Kansas City Royals third baseman George Brett races out of the dugout and into one of the most famous player-umpire arguments in the history of MLB.

Jan. 9, 1958 - Oscar Robertson Scored 56 Points at Madison Square Garden

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The New York Times reported in 2008 that Cincinnati basketball sophomore Oscar Robertson scored 56 points at Madison Square Garden against Seton Hall . The final score was Cincinnati 118 and Seton Hall 54. Robertson outscored the entire opposition.

Robertson was 22-for-32 and hit all 12 free throws. Keep in mind, this was before three-point shots and well before the NCAA instituted a shot clock. Robertson eventually was inducted into the National Basketball Hall of Fame for his vaunted college and NBA career.

below is a snippet from The New York Times:

"When the Big O First Played the Garden: 56 in ’58"
By OSCAR ROBERTSON
Published: March 9, 2008

When we took the court that night, we had an 8-2 record. A guard in high school, I was playing forward and averaging about 30 points and 16 rebounds a game. An injury had sidelined our 6-10 senior pivotman, Connie Dierking, so we were still adjusting at both ends of the court. We were a fast-breaking, high-scoring team, and given the opportunity, my teammates could put the ball in the basket as well.

Our game tipped off in front of what seemed like a mostly empty building. (I think the crowd was about 4,500.) I missed my first jumper, but on the next possession, I backed my defender down, then spun off him for a scooping layup. From that point, I was pretty much in a zone, hitting jump shot after jump shot, or posting up, or finishing fast breaks. The ball kept going in the basket for me, and our whole team was fast-breaking and scoring at will. I was taken out with two minutes left, and the final score was Cincinnati 118, Seton Hall 54.

I did not know how many points I had until I was cornered in the dressing room by the largest horde of reporters I had ever seen, all of whom wanted to ask about my record night. I had hit 22 of 32 field-goal attempts and 12 of 12 free throws.

I’m afraid I wasn’t a very exciting interview, giving mostly monosyllabic replies and identifying my first state high school championship as my biggest thrill to date. One writer stayed until after all the others had left, and introduced himself as Milton Gross of The New York Post.

“You know, if you’re a star, you have to learn how to talk to the media,” he said.

“But I don’t know them,” I replied.

He said he would be willing to give advice on dealing with the press — an offer I was happy to accept — and he became a trusted friend and confidant for the rest of my college and professional careers.

When I finally dressed and left the Garden, it was late; the streets were empty and glowing. A light snow was in the air. I was with my roommate, Chuck Machock. The team had long gone, so we walked back to the Paramount Hotel, talking about the game we had just played and everything that had happened afterward. I was not sure why, but I had a sense that my life would never again be the same after that night.

"If a tie is like kissing your sister, losing is like kissing your grandmother with her teeth out." - George Brett
Brett is one of four players in MLB history to accumulate 3,000 hits, 300 home runs, and a career .300 batting average (the others being Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, and Stan Musial).

"If a tie is like kissing your sister, losing is like kissing your grandmother with her teeth out." - George Brett

Brett is one of four players in MLB history to accumulate 3,000 hits, 300 home runs, and a career .300 batting average (the others being Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, and Stan Musial).

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