Sept. 25, 2000 - Vince Carter jumped over 7-foot-2 center with “the Dunk of Death”

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Vince Carter jumped over 7-foot-2 French center Frédéric Weis at the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sydney.

Teammate Jason Kidd said it was “One of the best plays I’ve ever seen.” The French media later dubbed it “le dunk de la mort” (“the Dunk of Death”).

"the Dunk of Death" video:

"I think goals should never be easy, they should force you to work, even if they are uncomfortable at the time." - Michael Phelps

Do not be afraid to step outside of your comfort zone.

"Everybody in the world has an ego. The only difference between us is we have a reason to have an ego." - Charles Barkley, on the ‘Dream Team’

#KillYourEgo.

"It’s not what other people believe you can do, it’s what you believe." - Gail Devers

Believe in yourself.

July 31, 1976 - Sugar Ray Leonard, Michael and Leon Spinks were among five US boxers to win gold medals at Montreal Olympics

Sugar Ray Leonard, fighting with photos of his girlfriend and young son pinned to his socks, won at light welterweight, sweeping all his opponents 5-0, and then did what he would do numerous times as a pro: RETIRE! Brothers Michael Spinks and Leon Spinks won Gold at middleweight and light heavyweight. Leo Randolph and Howard Davis Jr. also brought home the Gold for the U.S at the 1976 Games. Many consider the 1976 U.S. team to be the greatest boxing team in the history of the Olympics.

"Great moments are born from great opportunity." - Herb Brooks

Seize the moment.

"The integrity of the game is everything." - Peter Ueberroth

Aug. 9, 1936 - Owens won his fourth gold medal at the Summer Olympics in Berlin

Jesse Owens was the first American to win four medals in one Olympics. With his four gold medals, Owens was the star of the Berlin Olympics. He equaled the world record (10.3 seconds) in the 100-meter race and broke the world records in the 200-meter race (20.7 seconds) and in the broad jump (26 feet 5 3/8 inches). He was enthusiastically applauded by the largely German crowd and developed a friendship with German long jumper and silver medalist Luz Long.

His relay team set a new world record of 39.8 seconds, which held for 20 years. In their strong showing in track-and-field events at the XIth Olympiad, Owens and other African American athletes struck a propaganda blow against Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, who planned to use the Berlin Games as a showcase of supposed Aryan superiority.

"Keep your dreams alive. Understand to achieve anything requires faith and belief in yourself, vision, hard work, determination, and dedication. Remember all things are possible for those who believe." - Gail Devers

Aug. 4, 1936 - Jesse Owens wins gold in the long jump at Olympics in Berlin

It was the second of four gold medals Jesse Owens won in Berlin, as he firmly dispelled German Fuhrer Adolf Hitler’s notion of the superiority of an Aryan “master race,” for all the world to see.

110,000 spectators watched Owens slam the door on Hitler’s racist theories. In the morning, after fouling on his first two qualifying jumps, Owens finally leaped his way into the final, where he met the young German Lutz Long. Long tied the heavily favored Owens on his second jump, but Owens answered the challenge with a mark of 26’ 5 ½”, the first jump over 26 feet in Olympic history, and an Olympic record that would stand for 24 years. As Owens and Lutz walked arm in arm around the track, the German crowd roared its approval. Hitler promptly left the stadium, missing the medal ceremony.

"I decided I wasn’t going to come down. I was going to fly. I was going to stay up in the air forever." - Jesse Owens

"If you are afraid of failure you don’t deserve to be successful!" - Charles Barkley

"If you are afraid of failure you don’t deserve to be successful!" - Charles Barkley

"Push yourself again and again. Don’t give an inch until the final buzzer sounds." - Larry Bird

"Push yourself again and again. Don’t give an inch until the final buzzer sounds." - Larry Bird

"I’m working for the Lord, and even though the Lord’s pay isn’t very high, his retirement program is." - George Foreman

"I’m working for the Lord, and even though the Lord’s pay isn’t very high, his retirement program is." - George Foreman

June 3, 1999 - Karl Malone won his second MVP award

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"The Mailman" averaged 23.8 points 9.4 rebounds and 4.1 assists while leading the Jazz to a 37-13 record during the lockout shortened season. Malone previously won the award for his play during the 1996-97 season.

Karl Malone spent his first 18 seasons (1985–2003) in the NBA with the Utah Jazz and formed a formidable duo with his teammate John Stockton. Malone was a two-time NBA Most Valuable Player, a 14-time NBA All-Star, and an 11-time member of the All-NBA first team. He scored the second most career points in NBA history (36,928), and holds the records for most free throws attempted and made. He is generally considered one of the greatest power forwards in NBA history. Internationally, Malone competed with the United States national team in the Summer Olympic games of 1992 and 1996; in both years he won gold medals. He was inducted into the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame in 2010.

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