Sept 30, 1927 - Babe Ruth became the first player to hit 60 home runs in a season

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The 1927 season featured a fearsome New York Yankees lineup of power hitters known as “Murderer’s Row” that included Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Tony Lazzerri and Bob Meusel. Ruth led the American League in home runs throughout the year, but did not appear to be within reach of his record 59 home runs, set in 1921, until he hit 16 in the month of September, tying his record on September 29.

On September 30, in the last game of the season, Ruth came to the plate against lefty Tom Zachary of the Washington Senators in the eighth inning. With the count at 2-1, Ruth launched a Zachary pitch high into the right-field bleachers, and then took a slow stroll around the bases as the crowd celebrated by tearing paper into confetti and throwing hats into the air. Upon assuming his position in right-field for the ninth inning, those seated in the bleachers waved hankies at the famed slugger; Ruth responded with multiple military salutes.

(via athleticpoetics)

"Baseball is a game, yes. It is also a business. But what it most truly is, is disguised combat. For all its gentility, its almost leisurely pace, baseball is violence under wraps." - Willie Mays

More than a game.

Sept. 29, 1954 - Willie Mays of the Giants made his famous over the shoulder catch

The Catch refers to a memorable defensive baseball play by Willie Mays during Game 1 of the 1954 World Series between the New York Giants and the Cleveland Indians at the Polo Grounds in New York on a ball hit by Vic Wertz.

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"I really don’t like talking about money. All I can say is that the Good Lord must have wanted me to have it." - Larry Bird

The bank is open.

Sept. 27, 1983 - Larry Bird signed a 7-year, $15 million contract with the Celtics

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Larry Bird became the highest paid Celtic at the time.

In 1983-84 the Celtics would go 62-20 and finally get back to the NBA Finals after a three year hiatus. In the final, the Celtics came back from a 2-1 deficit to defeat the Los Angeles Lakers, winning their 15th championship. Bird renewed his college rivalry with Lakers star Magic Johnson during this series.

"A muscle is like a car. If you want it to run better in the morning, you have to warm it up." - Florence Griffith Joyner

Stretch it out.

Sept. 26, 1988 - Ben Johnson tested positive for steroids and stripped of his 100-meter gold medal

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On September 24, 1988, Johnson won the 100m final at the Summer Olympics in Seoul, lowering his own world record to 9.79 seconds. Johnson would later remark that he would have been even faster had he not raised his hand in the air just before he finished the race. However, Johnson’s urine samples were found to contain stanozolol, and he was disqualified two days later. He later admitted having used steroids when he ran his 1987 world record, which caused the IAAF to rescind that record as well. Johnson and coach Charlie Francis complained that they used doping in order to remain on an equal footing with the other top athletes on drugs they had to compete against.

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"The medals don’t mean anything and the glory doesn’t last. It’s all about your happiness. The rewards are going to come, but my happiness is just loving the sport and having fun performing." - Jackie Joyner-Kersee

"Because I’m Happy." Pharrell Williams

Sept. 24, 1988 - Jackie Joyner-Kersee set a world record of 7,291 points in the heptathlon at the Olympics in Seoul

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At the 1988 Games in Seoul, Jackie Joyner-Kersee set the still-standing heptathlon world record of 7,291 points. The silver and bronze medalists were Sabine John and Anke Vater-Behmer, both of whom were representing East Germany. Five days later, Joyner-Kersee won her second gold medal, leaping to an Olympic record of 7.40 m (24 ft 3 1⁄4 in) in the long jump.

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"In my mind, I’m always the best. If I walk out on the court and I think the next person is better, I’ve already lost." - Venus Williams

Believe in yourself.

Sept. 23, 1988 - Jose Conseco, at age 24, became the first player in MLB history to join the 40-40 club

The Major League benchmark for a truly great offensive season lasted nearly a century and was the attainment of 30 home runs and 30 stolen bases. In April of 1988, Jose Conseco guaranteed he would hit at least 40 home runs and steal at least 40 bases in the upcoming season. On September 23, 1988, an all-time plateau was reached as Conseco set the new benchmark for power & speed at 40 home runs (finished the season with 42) and 40 stolen bases during the same season.

In recognition of his record the street in front of his former high school was named after him but was later rescinded in 2008 after he admitted to previously using drugs throughout his career. That same year, he helped the Oakland Athletics to the World Series but they lost to the Los Angeles Dodgers in five games. Canseco was unanimously named the American League’s Most Valuable Player in 1988, with a .307 batting average, 120 runs scored, 124 RBI, 42 home runs, and 40 stolen bases.

"Assists is what Earvin is all about. That’s what my whole life has been, assisting others." - Magic Johnson

The point man.

Sept. 22, 1993 - 46 year-old Nolan Ryan pitched his last game

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Nolan Ryan's very durable arm finally gave out in Seattle on September 22, 1993, when he tore a ligament, ending his career two starts earlier than planned. Briefly attempting to pitch past the injury, Ryan threw one further pitch after tearing his ligament; with his injured arm, his final pitch was measured at 98 miles per hour.

Ryan’s last start was his career worst; he allowed a single, four walks, and a grand slam in the top of the first without recording an out. It was his record setting 10th grand slam given up of his career. (Ryan left trailing 5–0, and the fourth walk was completed by a reliever after Ryan’s injury, but credited to Ryan.) Greg Myers of the California Angels was the last strikeout victim of Nolan Ryan’s career, on September 17, 1993.

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"Always persevere, always have a great perspective, and always have great purpose in your life." - Russell Wilson

Always.

"Every game I’ve ever played, regardless if it was pre-season or Super Bowl, meant the same to me, and I laid it all on the line." - Brett Favre

110%

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