Feb. 24, 2002 - Team Canada defeats the U.S., 5-2, to win Gold Medal at the 2002 Winter Olympics

Team Canada and the US faced off in the final. For both nations, the gold-medal game came coincidentally on the anniversary of each nation’s last gold medal in men’s Olympic hockey. Canada last won 50 years previously at the 1952 Winter Olympics when they tied the US 3-3 (Olympic ice hockey previously only had a round-robin portion). The US won their last gold medal when they defeated Finland two days after “The Miracle on Ice" in 1980. Both games, coincidentally were played on a Sunday.

The Canada-USA final was tied at 2–2, however Canada then scored three goals to win 5–2. It was only the second time and first in 70 years that the US men’s hockey team lost an Olympic game on home soil. The first loss came against Canada (a 2-1 OT loss) in their first game at the 1932 Winter Olympics in Lake Placid.

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Feb. 22, 1980 - Team USA beat U.S.S.R. 4-3 during the 1980 Winter Olympics

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"Do you believe in miracles?! YES!"

The “Miracle on Ice" is the name in American popular culture for a medal-round men’s ice hockey game during the 1980 Winter Olympics at Lake Placid, New York. The United States team, made up of amateur and collegiate players and led by coach Herb Brooks, defeated the Soviet team, who had won nearly every world championship and Olympic tournament since 1954.

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"Great moments are born from great opportunity." - Herb Brooks

Seize the moment.

"It’s hard to win, but it’s harder to keep winning." - Alexandre Bilodeau

Repeat!

"There will be obstacles. There will be doubters. There will be mistakes. But with hard work there are no limits." - Michael Phelps

Hard work. Dedication.

"Being the first to cross the finish line makes you a winner in only one phase of life. It’s what you do after that really counts." - Ralph Boston

Cool photo! Ralph Boston, right, with Jesse Owens after breaking Owen’s 25-year-old long jump record.

"I am building a fire, and everyday I train, I add more fuel. At just the right moment, I light the match." - Mia Hamm

"I am building a fire, and everyday I train, I add more fuel. At just the right moment, I light the match." - Mia Hamm

"These are my new shoes. They’re good shoes. They won’t make you rich like me, they won’t make you rebound like me, they definitely won’t make you handsome like me. They’ll only make you have shoes like me. That’s it." - Charles Barkley

"These are my new shoes. They’re good shoes. They won’t make you rich like me, they won’t make you rebound like me, they definitely won’t make you handsome like me. They’ll only make you have shoes like me. That’s it." - Charles Barkley

Nov. 7, 1991- Magic Johnson announces he is HIV-positive and retires from the NBA

After a physical before the 1991–92 NBA season, Magic Johnson discovered that he had tested positive for HIV. In a press conference held on November 7, 1991, Johnson made a public announcement that he would retire immediately. He stated that his wife Cookie and their unborn child did not have HIV, and that he would dedicate his life to “battle this deadly disease”. Johnson initially said that he did not know how he contracted the disease, but later acknowledged that it was through having multiple sexual partners during his playing career. At the time, only a small percentage of HIV-positive American men had contracted it from heterosexual sex, and it was initially rumored that Johnson was gay or bisexual, although he denied both. Johnson later accused Isiah Thomas of spreading the rumors, a claim Thomas denied. Johnson’s HIV announcement became a major news story in the United States, and in 2004 was named as ESPN’s seventh most memorable moment of the past 25 years. Many articles praised Johnson as a hero, and former U.S. President George H. W. Bush said, “For me, Magic is a hero, a hero for anyone who loves sports.”

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"You can’t put a limit on anything. The more you dream, the farther you get." - Michael Phelps

"You can’t put a limit on anything. The more you dream, the farther you get." - Michael Phelps

Oct. 17, 1968 - Bob Beamon long jumped 29 feet, 2 1/2 inches

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Dubbed by many as the ‘Leap of the Century’ Bob Beamon's long jump remained the world record for 22 years, 316 days until it was broken in 1991 by Mike Powell. This is the second longest holding of this record, as Jesse Owens held the record for 25 years, 1935-1960.

video of the jump

Oct. 16, 1968 - U.S. Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their black-gloved fists

U.S. Olympians Tommie Smith and John Carlos raised their black-gloved fists in support of black power on the medals podium, after they had finished first and third in the 200 meters at the Summer Olympics in Mexico City.

As they turned to face their flags and hear the American national anthem (The Star-Spangled Banner), they each raised a black-gloved fist and kept them raised until the anthem had finished. Smith, Carlos and Australian silver medalist Peter Norman all wore human rights badges on their jackets. In his autobiography, Silent Gesture, Tommie Smith stated that the gesture was not a “Black Power” salute, but a “human rights salute”. The event is regarded as one of the most overtly political statements in the history of the modern Olympic Games.

"Hard days are the best because that’s when champions are made." - Gabby Douglas

"Hard days are the best because that’s when champions are made." - Gabby Douglas

"Gold medals aren’t really made of gold. They’re made of sweat, determination, and a hard-to-find alloy called guts." - Dan Gable

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