July 1, 1980 - Steve Ovett of Britain set a world record in the mile in 3 minutes 48.8 seconds

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Getting ready for his upcoming Olympic showdown with Sebastian Coe, Steve Ovett takes down Coe’s World Record with a 3:48.8 clocking in Oslo, Norway. Coe had set a record of 3:48.95 the previous year - July 13th, 1979 - on the very same track. Finishing second to Ovett in this race was some 19 year old kid named Steve Cram, stopping the clock at 3:53.8.

Steve Ovette - World Record - 1 Mile Run, 1980:

"People always say I’m a legend, but I’m not. Not until I’ve defended my Olympic titles. That’s when I’ve decided I’ll be a legend." - Usain Bolt

Legendary status.

May 31, 2008 - Usain Bolt established a 100 m world record with 9.72 s at the Reebok Grand Prix

Pushed on by a tail wind of 1.7 m/s, Usain Bolt ran 9.72 s at the Reebok Grand Prix held in the Icahn Stadium in New York City, breaking Asafa Powell’s record of 9.74 s. The record time was even more remarkable in light of the fact that it was only his fifth senior run over the distance. Tyson Gay again finished second and said of Bolt “It looked like his knees were going past my face”. Commentators noted that Bolt appeared to have gained a psychological advantage over fellow  contender Gay.

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#MotivationalMondays

"With self-discipline almost anything is possible." - Theodore Roosevelt

Motivational video captures training regimes of prodigy boxers Muhammad Ali, Mike Tyson, and Floyd Mayweather Jr., while Les Brown reminds that it’s possible to make your dream become reality.

Have A Great Week Everyone!

"Doctors and scientists said that breaking the four-minute mile was impossible, that one would die in the attempt. Thus, when I got up from the track after collapsing at the finish line, I figured I was dead." - Roger Bannister

May 6, 1954 - 60 years ago, Roger Bannister broke the four-minute mile barrier

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In the sport of athletics, the four-minute mile is the act of completing the mile run (1,760 yards, or 1,609.344 metres) in less than four minutes. It was first achieved in 1954 by Roger Bannister in 3:59.4. The “four minute barrier” has since been broken by many male athletes, and is now the standard of all male professional middle distance runners. In the last 50 years the mile record has been lowered by almost 17 seconds. Running a mile in four minutes translates to a speed of 15 miles per hour (24.14 km/h, or 2:29.13 per kilometer, or 14.91 seconds per 100 meters).

"If you don’t have confidence, you’ll always find a way not to win." - Carl Lewis

Confidence is key and keys open doors.

Apr. 12, 1980 - Terry Fox embarked on his Marathon of Hope

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The Trek Across Canada began on April 12, 1980, when Terry Fox dipped his right leg in the Atlantic Ocean near St. John’s, Newfoundland, and filled two large bottles with ocean water. He intended to keep one as a souvenir and pour the other into the Pacific Ocean upon completing his journey at Victoria, British Columbia. Fox was supported on his run by Doug Alward, who drove the van and cooked meals.

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"Number one is just to gain a passion for running. To love the morning, to love the trail, to love the pace on the track. And if some kid gets really good at it, that’s cool too." - Pat Tyson

That’s cool too.

#MotivationalMondays

"It’s not our dreams themselves that motivate us to reach for them, it’s believing they’re within our reach."

Redefine your limitations.

"Failure I can live with. Not trying is what I can’t handle." - Sanya Richards-Ross

#MotivationalMondays

"You were born to win, but to be a winner you must plan to win, prepare to win, and expect to win." - Zig Ziglar

The winners anthem.

Sept. 26, 1988 - Ben Johnson tested positive for steroids and stripped of his 100-meter gold medal

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On September 24, 1988, Ben Johnson won the 100m final at the Summer Olympics in Seoul, lowering his own world record to 9.79 seconds. Johnson would later remark that he would have been even faster had he not raised his hand in the air just before he finished the race. However, Johnson’s urine samples were found to contain stanozolol, and he was disqualified two days later. He later admitted having used steroids when he ran his 1987 world record, which caused the IAAF to rescind that record as well. Johnson and coach Francis complained that they used doping in order to remain on an equal footing with the other top athletes on drugs they had to compete against. In testimony before the Dubin inquiry into drug use, Francis charged that Johnson was only one of many cheaters, and he just happened to get caught. Later, six of the eight finalists of the 100-meter race tested positive for banned drugs or were implicated in a drug scandal at some point in their careers: Carl Lewis, who was given the gold medal, Linford Christie, who was moved up to the silver medal and who went on to win gold at the next Games, Dennis Mitchell, who was moved up to fourth place and finished third to Christie in 1992, and Desai Williams, Johnson’s countryman who won a bronze medal at the Los Angeles Games in 1984. In the ESPN documentary ESPN 30 for 30 Films: 9.79*, eventual silver medallist Christie states, and footage of the race shows, that Lewis “ran out of his lane… two or three times” during the race, which should have resulted in Lewis’ automatic disqualification.

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"When anyone tells me I can’t do anything, I’m just not listening any more." - Florence Griffith-Joyner

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